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This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Gene Set Enrichment Analyses: lessons learned from the heart failure phenotype

  • Vinicius Tragante1Email authorView ORCID ID profile,
  • Johannes M. I. H. Gho1,
  • Janine F. Felix2,
  • Ramachandran S. Vasan3,
  • Nicholas L. Smith4,
  • Benjamin F. Voight5, 6, 7,
  • CHARGE Heart Failure Working Group,
  • Colin Palmer8,
  • Pim van der Harst9,
  • Jason H. Moore10 and
  • Folkert W. Asselbergs1, 11, 12, 13
BioData Mining201710:18

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13040-017-0137-5

Received: 6 December 2016

Accepted: 9 May 2017

Published: 26 May 2017

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
6 Dec 2016 Submitted Original manuscript
9 Jan 2017 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Michael Mooney
23 Feb 2017 Author responded Author comments - Vinicius Tragante
Resubmission - Version 2
23 Feb 2017 Submitted Manuscript version 2
6 Mar 2017 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Michael Mooney
12 Apr 2017 Author responded Author comments - Vinicius Tragante
Resubmission - Version 3
12 Apr 2017 Submitted Manuscript version 3
Publishing
9 May 2017 Editorially accepted
26 May 2017 Article published 10.1186/s13040-017-0137-5

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Cardiology, Division Heart & Lungs, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
(2)
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
(3)
Departments of Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, USA
(4)
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
(5)
Department of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
(6)
Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
(7)
Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
(8)
Population Pharmacogenetics Group, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK
(9)
Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
(10)
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Institute for Biomedical Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
(11)
Durrer Center for Cardiovascular Research, ICIN-Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands
(12)
Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London, London, UK
(13)
Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research and Institute of Health Informatics, University College London, London, UK

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