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BioData Mining

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Identifying gene-gene interactions that are highly associated with Body Mass Index using Quantitative Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (QMDR)

  • Rishika De1,
  • Shefali S. Verma2,
  • Fotios Drenos3,
  • Emily R. Holzinger2,
  • Michael V. Holmes4,
  • Molly A. Hall2,
  • David R. Crosslin5,
  • David S. Carrell6,
  • Hakon Hakonarson7,
  • Gail Jarvik5, 8,
  • Eric Larson6,
  • Jennifer A. Pacheco9,
  • Laura J. Rasmussen-Torvik10,
  • Carrie B. Moore2, 11,
  • Folkert W. Asselbergs12, 13, 14,
  • Jason H. Moore15,
  • Marylyn D. Ritchie2Email author,
  • Brendan J. Keating7, 16Email author and
  • Diane Gilbert-Diamond17, 18Email author
BioData Mining20158:41

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13040-015-0074-0

Received: 12 June 2015

Accepted: 4 December 2015

Published: 14 December 2015

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
12 Jun 2015 Submitted Original manuscript
Author responded Author comments
Reviewed Reviewer Report
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
Publishing
4 Dec 2015 Editorially accepted
14 Dec 2015 Article published 10.1186/s13040-015-0074-0

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Computational Genetics Laboratory, Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, USA
(2)
Center for Systems Genomics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 512 Wartik Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA
(3)
Centre for Cardiovascular Genetics, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London, London, UK
(4)
Division of Transplant Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
(5)
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
(6)
Group Health Research Institute, Metropolitan Park East, Seattle, USA
(7)
The Joseph Stokes Jr. Research Institute, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, USA
(8)
Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
(9)
Center for Genetic Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, USA
(10)
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, USA
(11)
Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA
(12)
Department of Cardiology, Division Heart and Lungs, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
(13)
Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, UK
(14)
Durrer Center for Cardiogenetic Research, ICIN-Netherlands Heart Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands
(15)
Institute for Biomedical Informatics, The Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
(16)
University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
(17)
Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences at Dartmouth, Hanover, USA
(18)
Department of Epidemiology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, USA

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